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ENG 111: English Composition: Find Articles

Credo Mind Map

Use Credo Reference's Mind Map to help you find more key words.

Find Articles

Libraries purchase access to jounal, magazine, and newspaper articles by subscribing to databases. 

Below are databases that cover a wide range of topics. Search them using only a few keywords, not full sentences.

Peer Review Process

Scholarly vs. Popular Articles: What's the Difference?

This three-minute tutorial from the Peabody Library will show you how to differentiate between scholarly (also known as "peer-reviewed") and popular articles.

Can I Use This Article?

Ask yourself these questions before deciding to use an article as a source for your paper:

   1. Is the information up-to-date?

   2. Who is the author, and what is his/her expertise and educational background?

   3. Does the author provide support (citations, statistics) for his/her assertions?

   4. What is the political affiliation (if any) of the publication? Do you need a neutral source?

   5. Does the article provide a general introduction to the topic or a specialized, narrow viewpoint intended for scholars already familiar with the subject?  Which do you need?   

Ask Me

Ann Geht's picture
Ann Geht
Contact:
Ann Geht, Instruction Librarian
Office: (231) 995-1973
Reference Desk: (231) 995-1540
Text: (231) 774-6209
ageht@nmc.edu
Twitter: @NMC_library

NMC Osterlin Library
Office: Osterlin 100C
1701 E. Front St.
Traverse City, MI 49686

Suggested Periodicals

Eclectic, liberal magazine that compiles articles from the independent press.

Articles on the global economy, environmental issues, education, and health.